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Common Guava, Psidium guajava L.

Go to - Landscape Trees
Landscape Shrubs

Family - Myrtaceae

Also called the Apple Guava, this plant can grow as a large shrub or as a small tree up to 30 feet tall.

The common Guava has been so widely distributed by man and beast that its geographic origins are uncertain, but it is believed to be from southern Mexico and/or Central America.

Guava is grown commercially for its fruit in Florida, as well as being used for a home landscape and fruit tree, there are several varieties available  developed specifically for Florida.

U.S.D.A. Zones 9-11

Guava is not particular about soil composition, ideal soil pH is from 4.5 to 7 & will grow well in places that are too wet for most fruit trees. Full sun is needed for best fruit production.

Guava begins producing fruit at 3-4 years of age, flowers and fruits year round in Florida with peaks in summer and again in the spring.

Fruit is 1 to 4 inches long & can be round, pear or egg shaped. Depending on the variety, the fruits skin can be thick or thin, with many or few seeds and can be sweet or acidic, the flesh varies in color from white to pink.

Guava is subject to a number of insect pests and diseases including the Caribbean fruit fly.

The common Guava and Strawberry Guava are listed as invasive species in Florida. It is recommended they not be planted in South Florida. There are other varieties available that are not invasive.

These two should only be planted in central Florida in conditions where they can be strictly controlled to prevent them from spreading into surrounding natural areas. Birds and other animals will spread seed into the wild, where it forms dense thickets, crowding out native plants.

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